Triadic conflict

These are the values of the triadic conflict (τ) for all networks to which the statistic applies and for which it was computed. In total, it has been computed for 13 networks.

The triadic conflict (τ) is a statistic that applies to signed, unipartite graphs. It equals the fraction of triangles that are in conflict. A triangle is a set of three edges that are connected to form a triangle, i.e., a set of three nodes that are all mutually connected. In a network that has positive as well as negative edges, we can consider the balance of a triangle: A triangle is balanced when it is consistent with the usual interpretation of positive and negative edges. For instance, a triangle consisting of two negative edges and one positive edge is balanced because it can be interpreted as "The enemy of my friend is my enemy." Following similar reasoning, a triangle ends up being balanced when it has an odd number of negative edges. Conversely, a triangle that is not balanced is considered to be in conflict. This statistic measures the fraction of triangles in the network that are in conflict. It ranges from zero to one, and equals zero when all triangles are balanced, and equals one when all triangles are in conflict. It is undefined if the network does not contain triangles, and thus is not computed for bipartite graphs. For non-bipartite graphs that do not contain negative edges, it is trivially equal to zero, and thus we do not report the statistic for such networks.

The full definition of the triadic conflict as well as its properties and relationships to other graph statistics can be found in the KONECT handbook.

NameAttributesτ
Highland tribes
0.132 353
Crisis in a Cloister
0.380 062
Congress votes
0.033 018 9
Dutch college
0.156 077
Bitcoin Alpha
0.143 562
Bitcoin OTC
0.127 519
Chess
0.493 546
Wikipedia elections
0.228 161
Slashdot Zoo
0.134 578
WikiSigned
0.076 526 5
Epinions
0.095 043 7
Wikipedia conflict
0.376 808
Libimseti.cz
0.523 841